Measure around the chest at the fullest point of the bust. Waist. Measure around your natural waistline. Hips/Seat. Measure around fullest point of seat while standing. Inseam. Measure similar pants that fit .

These were based on the chest measurement, with other measurements being assumed to be either proportional the circumference of the neck, waist, hips, and thighs or easily altered length of the inseam Felsenthal Companies who publish catalogs may provide the measurements for their sizes, which may vary even among different styles of the same type of garment.

Use the chart below to determine your size. If you’re on the borderline between two sizes, order the smaller size for a tighter fit or the larger size for a looser fit. If your measurements for bust and waist correspond to two different suggested sizes, order the size indicated by your bust measurement.
Our sizes are 0X, 1X, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, 6X, 7X, and 8X (22W to 48W equivalent) Measurements on our size chart reflect body measurements and are not the actual garment measurements Each size has ease* built in for comfort and the amount of ease will vary by style.
Use the chart below to determine your size. If you’re on the borderline between two sizes, order the smaller size for a tighter fit or the larger size for a looser fit. If your measurements for bust and waist correspond to two different suggested sizes, order the size indicated by your bust measurement.
Our sizes are 0X, 1X, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, 6X, 7X, and 8X (22W to 48W equivalent) Measurements on our size chart reflect body measurements and are not the actual garment measurements Each size has ease* built in for comfort and the amount of ease will vary by style.
Use the chart below to determine your size. If you’re on the borderline between two sizes, order the smaller size for a tighter fit or the larger size for a looser fit. If your measurements for bust and waist correspond to two different suggested sizes, order the size indicated by your bust measurement.

Our sizes are 0X, 1X, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, 6X, 7X, and 8X (22W to 48W equivalent) Measurements on our size chart reflect body measurements and are not the actual garment measurements Each size has ease* built in for comfort and the amount of ease will vary by style.

These were based on the chest measurement, with other measurements being assumed to be either proportional the circumference of the neck, waist, hips, and thighs or easily altered length of the inseam Felsenthal As this was largely successful in men, the same approach was attempted in the early 20th century for women using the bust as the sole measurement Felsenthal However, this proved unsuccessful because women's bodies have far more variety in shape.

A woman with an hourglass figure and a woman with an apple-shaped figure who have the same bust size will not have the same waist or hip sizes.

This was a significant problem for mail-order companies, and several attempts at predictable, standard sizing were made Felsenthal In the s, the statisticians Ruth O'Brien and William Shelton received a Works Progress Administration grant to conduct the most ambitious effort to solve this problem. Their team measured almost 15, women across the US.

After discovering the complex diversity of women's actual sizes, which produced five to seven different body shapes, they proposed a three-part sizing system. Each size would be the combination of a single number, representing an upper body measurement, plus an indicator for height short, regular, and long and an indication for girth slim, regular, and stout. The various combinations of height and girth resulted in nine different sizes for each numerical upper-body measurement, which was highly impractical for manufacturing Felsenthal As a result, O'Brien and Shelton's work was rejected.

In , the National Bureau of Standards invented a new sizing system, based on the hourglass figure and using only the bust size to create an arbitrary standard of sizes ranging from 8 to 38, with an indication for height short, regular, and tall and lower-body girth plus or minus. The resulting commercial standard was not widely popular, and was declared voluntary in and withdrawn entirely in It has not been widely adopted.

Women's sizes are divided into various types, depending on height. These charts give an indication of size only and are by no means exact as they vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, sometimes by a full inch up and down. There are multiple size types, designed to fit somewhat different body shapes. Variations include the height of the person's torso known as back length , whether the bust, waist, and hips are straighter characteristic of teenagers or curvier like many adult women , and whether the bust is higher or lower characteristic of younger and older women, respectively.

Please compare to your favorite fit charts. These measurements conflict with many other size charts. Simply put, more expensive clothing fudges the most on what size the shopper wears. A more expensive line of clothing is more likely to use a smaller size to identify a dress with larger measurements.

The variation is actually quite large. For example, a dress that is labeled a size 14 can have a bust measurement anywhere from 93 to about The same dresses have a hip measurement ranging between and centimetres. See our Brand Size Guides page for more information. BS was produced in , by the British Standards Institute , in an attempt to standardise British sizes for women's clothes from the smallest size 8 to the largest size 32, however without any legal requirements for retailers to use the standard, it had little effect.

It has since been superseded by EN which uses body dimensions in order to size clothes and was created in order to provide a common set of European clothing sizes. The standard was also quite lax giving ranges for bust measurements and hip measurements for each of the sizes as below:. There is a lot of cultural pressure for UK women to "be a smaller size". What many women may not realise, however, is that this is an illusion.

The National Sizing Survey indicates that the shape of UK women's bodies have significantly shifted in the last 50 years, but our mental pictures often remain the same. The good news for UK shoppers is that the European Union is promoting a new sizing system, with actual measurements listed on the labels instead of the often-confusing UK dress sizes.

Clothing bust, waist and hip measurements in inches, with conversions to cm for UK dress sizes, including all the common dress sizes from 8 through to 18 (8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18). These sizes are also used in Australia and New Zealand. Use the chart below to determine your size. If you’re on the borderline between two sizes, order the smaller size for a tighter fit or the larger size for a looser fit. If your measurements for bust and waist correspond to two different suggested sizes, order the size indicated by your bust measurement. Our sizes are 0X, 1X, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, 6X, 7X, and 8X (22W to 48W equivalent) Measurements on our size chart reflect body measurements and are not the actual garment measurements Each size has ease* built in for comfort and the amount of ease will vary by style.